{window treatment wednesday: national window covering safety month}


 

Cute laughing baby standing in a white round bed. White nursery for young children. Little boy learning to stand in his crib. Toys for infant cot. Smiling child playing with toy bear in sunny bedroom.

We expect parents to cover electrical outlets, put gates on stairs, and childproof their doors and cabinets, but we often forget about the hidden danger of the cords from window coverings.

Yet the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says corded window coverings are one of the top five hidden hazards in American homes, with infants and children accidentally becoming entangled in window cords.

Safety Month

That’s why the CPSC and Window Covering Safety Council (WCSC) are urging parents and caregivers to check their window coverings for exposed and dangling cords as part of National Window Covering Safety Month.

The CPSC, WCSC, and safety advocates all recommend using only cordless window coverings or window coverings with inaccessible cords in homes with young children. “As a result of industry innovation, consumers have more choices than ever to purchase cordless products or those with inaccessible cords,” said WCSC Executive Director Peter Rush.

Safety Tips

The WCSC urges parents to replace window blinds, corded shades, and draperies with products that are cordless or have inaccessible cords marked with the Best for Kids™ certification label.  The label enables you to easily identify products best suited for homes with young children.

In rooms with corded window coverings, you should follow these safety guidelines:

  • Move all cribs, beds, furniture and toys away from windows and window cords, preferably to another wall.
  • Keep all window cords well out of the reach of children and eliminate any dangling cords.
  • Make sure that tasseled pull cords are as short as possible
  • Check that cord stops are properly installed and adjusted to limit the movement of inner lift cords.
  • Continuous-loop cords on draperies and vertical blinds should be permanently anchored to the floor or wall. 

Click on the link to view the different options offered by Hunter Douglas.

Since Frank and Elizabeth Hirshfield opened their first store in 1894, it has been our mission to do the best job possible meeting customer needs and solving customer problems. Hirshfield’s. People and products you can trust.

One Response to “{window treatment wednesday: national window covering safety month}”

  1. {installing window treatments safely} | Hirshfield's Color Club Says:

    […] systems are in place for child safety,” explains Scarrella. “Even if there aren’t children living in your home now, you may someday […]


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